MEDIA ADVISORY: Senator Pavlov to host Conservation Town Hall Special Guest Rodney Stokes, DNR Director

MEDIA ADVISORY: Senator Pavlov to host Conservation Town Hall
Special Guest Rodney Stokes, DNR Director

LANSING, MI, FEB. 23, 2012 —State Sen. Phil Pavlov will host DNR Director, Rodney Stokes, in the district Monday, February 27, for a conservation town hall about Michigan’s natural resource management.

Pavlov, R-St. Clair Township, invites all residents to come ready with questions for some of Michigan’s leading conservation and natural resources experts. Local DNR law enforcement officer, Sergeant Tom Wanless, and DNR wildlife biologists, Tim Payne and Tammy Girioux, will be among the presenters.

WHEN:    Monday, February 27, 2012, 7:00 – 8:30pm
 
WHERE: Donald E. Dodge Auditorium
  St. Clair County Office Building
  200 Grand River Ave
  Port Huron, MI
 
WHO:    State Sen. Phil Pavlov; DNR Director, Rodney Stokes; DNR Sergeant, Tom Wanless; DNR Wildlife Biologists, Tim Payne and Tammy Girioux

CONTACT:   Brenda Resch (517) 373-7708

"I’m pleased to have these experts come discuss conservation, because protecting Michigan’s natural resources is a priority,” said Pavlov.  "Hunting is an important part of our culture and our economy.  It’s who we are, and it creates jobs.  Careful management of our natural resources is vital to building a better Michigan."

Sen. Phil Pavlov, is vice chair of the Senate Committee on Natural Resources, Environment and Great Lakes.

For those unable to attend, questions and comments may be directed to Senator Pavlov’s office by email at SenPPavlov@senate.michigan.gov, or by Toll Free phone at (866) 305-2125.  Future events will be scheduled throughout the district, and will be announced at later dates. 
 

Pavlov helps Senate pass military funeral measures

State Sen. Phil Pavlov is standing on the side of all active service members, veterans and military families to help keep order and honor at funeral services.

Pavlov and his Senate Republican colleagues on Wednesday approved House Bills 4284 and 4745, which prohibit those who attempt to disgrace a funeral from making any statement or gesture, or engaging in any other conduct, that would make a funeral attendee feel intimidated, threatened or harassed.

“This common-sense legislation protects those who have fought for the freedoms and liberties that Americans have long enjoyed. We cannot sit idly by as others try to disrespect our fallen soldiers and their families,” said Pavlov, R–St. Clair Township. “It is our duty to protect our First Amendment rights while at the same time preserving the dignity and sanctity of veterans and military funerals. I will continue to fight to allow our service men and women and their families to lay their loved ones to rest in peace.”

According to the legislation, a person convicted of disrupting a funeral would be guilty of a felony punishable by up to two years imprisonment, a maximum fine of $5,000, or both. The bills also increase the penalty for previous offenders to up to four years imprisonment, a maximum fine of $10,000, or both.

The bills now head to the governor’s desk for his signature.

Similar laws regarding behavior at military funerals have passed recently in other states, including Illinois, Arizona and Wyoming.