Governor signs Pavlov bill to protect gun owners’ privacy

LANSING—Gov. Rick Snyder on Tuesday signed legislation to protect gun owners’ privacy by making firearms records confidential.

Under the new measures, firearms records are not subject to requests under the Freedom of Information Act and are available only to law enforcement officials, under certain conditions.

“Making gun ownership information public is an invasion of privacy and a threat to public safety,” said Sen. Phil Pavlov, R-St. Clair Township, sponsor of Senate Bill 834. “These laws ensure that this information stays private.”

Sen. Tom Casperson, R-Escanaba, introduced SB 49 last year in response to a need for the protection of privacy. A New York newspaper had published the names and personal addresses of gun permit holders in two counties north of New York City. Casperson’s measure ensures that no such information can be released in Michigan.

Sen. Goeff Hansen, sponsor of SB 881, said the laws are about safeguarding the rights of Michigan residents.  

“The Second Amendment is integral to our freedom and must be protected,” said Hansen, R-Hart. “This legislation strengthens Michigan law to ensure that all gun owners’ personal information is not jeopardized by those looking to infringe on our basic rights.”

The new laws ensure that firearms records can only be accessed or disclosed by a peace officer or other authorized individual for the following reasons:

  • The individual whose firearm records are the subject of disclosure has committed an offense with the pistol that violates a state law, a law of another state or a U.S. law;
  • The individual poses a threat to himself or herself or other individuals;
  • The individual’s firearm was used during the commission of an offense that violates a state law, a law of another state or a U.S. law; or
  • To ensure the safety of a peace officer.

A violation of the law will result in a civil infraction and possibly a $500 civil fine.

Dakota Moore, a state liaison with the National Rifle Association, thanked the sponsors of the bills.

“The NRA and its membership applaud the efforts of Senators Casperson, Hansen and Pavlov to ensure that law-abiding gun owners are protected from unwarranted scrutiny and discrimination merely for exercising their fundamental and constitutional right to keep and bear arms,” Moore said.

Note: For a print-quality version of this and other Pavlov photos, click the image or click Photowire under the Media Center tab, above.

Pavlov to host town hall in Algonac on protecting Lake Huron from nuclear waste dump

LANSING—State Sen. Phil Pavlov, R-St. Clair Township, is inviting residents of the 25th Senate District to a public town hall on Saturday, June 21 in Algonac on protecting Lake Huron from a Canadian nuclear waste dump.

Who:
Sen. Phil Pavlov, R-St. Clair Township; and anyone interested in the topic.

What:
Canadian officials propose to bury 7 million cubic feet of nuclear waste less than a quarter-mile from the shore of Lake Huron, directly across the lake from the residents of St. Clair, Sanilac and Huron counties. Pavlov will discuss the proposal and plans by Michigan lawmakers to stop it.

When:
Saturday, June 21
8:30 to 10 a.m.

Where:
Clay Township Council Chambers
4710 Pte. Tremble Road
Algonac, MI 48001

For more information, contact Pavlov’s office at 1-517-373-7708.

Senate unanimously passes legislation to halt proposed Canadian nuclear waste facility


Pavlov, Green seek immediate IJC and GLC intervention to protect lakes
www.ProtectLakeHuron.com

The Michigan Senate unanimously approved measures Wednesday to stop the construction of a Canadian nuclear waste dump on the shores of Lake Huron and strengthen Michigan’s protection of natural resources against radioactive waste.

Senate Bill 948, sponsored by Sen. Phil Pavlov, R-St. Clair Township, would ban the importation of radioactive waste into Michigan, while Senate Concurrent Resolution 16 (Pavlov) and Senate Resolution 151 (Green) call for a potentially binding recommendation from the International Joint Commission (IJC) to halt the construction of a permanent nuclear waste disposal facility in Kincardine, Ontario, less than a mile from Lake Huron. Passage of two more resolutions, SCR 17 (Pavlov) and SR 150 (Green), invokes the immediate intervention of the Great Lakes Commission.

The commission has already signaled their commitment to taking up a thorough review of the facility.

“The Great Lakes are a vital environmental and economic asset for our region, and for the state of Michigan in particular,” said Tim Eder, executive director of the Great Lakes Commission. “We take seriously our responsibility to safeguard the health of the lakes and agree that the proposed nuclear waste repository on the shore of Lake Huron in Ontario needs to be carefully evaluated and held to the highest safety standards. We appreciate Senator Pavlov’s leadership on this issue, and look forward to working with Michigan’s Legislature and our member states and the provinces of Ontario and Québec to carefully review the proposed facility and its potential to impact the Great Lakes.”

Besides banning the importation of radioactive waste, SB 948 would extend Michigan’s current ban on long-term radioactive waste disposal to include Class C radioactive waste—the most dangerous form of low-level radioactive waste—and create the Great Lakes Protection Radioactive Waste Advisory Board to assess a broad range of impacts from the proposed Ontario facility.

“Today’s vote shows the Michigan Senate is united in its opposition to this proposed facility. We’ve heard from residents all across the state about this flawed plan, and it needs to be stopped,” said Pavlov. “Not only would this nuclear dump threaten the health of natural resources in Michigan, it could critically damage the ecosystem of the entire Great Lakes basin.”

Pavlov urged concerned residents to visit www.ProtectLakeHuron.com to sign a petition on the issue.

Sen. Mike Green, R-Mayville, added, “Michigan has a long and proud history of protecting the Great Lakes to the benefit of our environment and our economy. Today we continued to build upon that legacy with a clear and bipartisan voice in the Michigan Senate in opposition to the threat of nuclear waste.”

Key conservation groups support the measures, including Michigan United Conservation Clubs, the Michigan Environmental Council, Alliance for the Great Lakes, Sierra Club Michigan and Michigan League of Conservation Voters.

SB 948 and SCRs 16 and 17 now head to the Michigan House of Representatives for further consideration. SRs 150 and 151 will be transmitted to their respective parties.
 

Senate committee unanimously passes legislation to halt proposed Canadian nuclear waste facility

LANSING—The Michigan Senate Natural Resources, Environment and Great Lakes Committee unanimously approved measures Thursday to stop the construction of a Canadian nuclear waste dump and strengthen Michigan’s protection of natural resources against radioactive waste.

Senate Bill 948, sponsored by Sen. Phil Pavlov, would ban the importation of radioactive waste into Michigan, while two Senate resolutions would call for a potentially binding recommendation from the International Joint Commission (IJC) to halt the construction of a permanent nuclear waste disposal facility in Kincardine, Ontario, on the shores of Lake Huron. Two separate resolutions would also call on the Great Lakes Commission (GLC) to intervene.

“The committee understands that this proposed nuclear waste dump cannot go forward,” said Pavlov, R-St. Clair Township. “The dangers it would pose to the Great Lakes and other natural resources throughout Michigan are simply too great. I urge everyone to sign the petition at www.ProtectLakeHuron.com and let our leaders know this proposal is unacceptable.”

Senate Concurrent Resolution 16 (Pavlov) and Senate Resolution 151 (Green) call on the president, the secretary of state and Congress to take the appropriate procedural steps to submit a letter of reference or request a binding decision from the International Joint Commission (IJC), the official organization appointed to prevent and resolve disputes over the use of the Great Lakes. SCR 17 (Pavlov) and SR 150 (Green) urge the Great Lakes Commission to study the impacts of the facility and take a formal position on it.

“The Great Lakes are Michigan’s most valuable natural resource, not only for our ecosystem but for our economy as well,” said Sen. Mike Green, R-Mayville. “Michigan has a long history of protecting this resource and that’s what we are joining together to do.”

In addition to banning the importation of all radioactive waste, SB 948 would extend Michigan’s current ban on long-term radioactive waste disposal to include Class C radioactive waste – the most dangerous form of low-level radioactive waste. The bill also would create the Great Lakes Protection Radioactive Waste Advisory Board to assess a broad range of public health, natural resource, cultural, archaeological and historical consequences of the proposed Ontario facility.

Several key conservation groups registered their support for the package, including Michigan United Conservation Clubs, the Michigan Environmental Council, Alliance for the Great Lakes, Sierra Club Michigan and Michigan League of Conservation Voters.

Senate Bill 948, SCRs 16 and 17 and SRs 150 and 151 now head to the full Senate for consideration.