Media Advisory: Pavlov and Green to host Bay City town hall on protecting Lake Huron from nuclear waste

LANSING—State Sens. Phil Pavlov, R-St. Clair Township, and Mike Green, R-Mayville, are inviting Bay and Thumb area residents in the 25th and 31st Senate districts to a public town hall on Monday, Oct. 6 in Bay City to discuss legislative and other efforts to protect Lake Huron from a proposed Canadian nuclear waste dump.

Who:

Sen. Phil Pavlov, R-St. Clair Township;

Sen. Mike Green, R-Mayville; and

Anyone interested in the topic.

What:

A public town hall meeting to inform residents about a Canadian nuclear waste dump proposal and plans by Michigan lawmakers to stop it.

Canadian officials propose to bury 7 million cubic feet of radioactive waste less than a mile from the shore of Lake Huron, directly across the lake from residents of the Bay and Thumb regions.

Pavlov and Green are leading an effort in Lansing to halt construction of the dump. Their legislation has passed the Michigan Senate unanimously and awaits action in the House of Representatives. More than 70 communities throughout the region have recently passed resolutions in support of the measures.

When:

Monday, Oct. 6

6:30 to 8 p.m.

Where:

Pere Marquette Depot

1904 Room

1000 Adams St.

Bay City, MI 48708

 

For more information, contact Pavlov’s office at 1-517-373-7708.

Pavlov announces community development grant for Marine City

LANSING—Sen. Phil Pavlov announced on Thursday a new state grant that will make possible façade improvements for three buildings in downtown Marine City.

The Michigan Strategic Fund recently approved a $195,310 Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) to the city for improvements to the Snug Theater, the Riviera Restaurant and a distressed building that is currently vacant.

“This grant will help Marine City continue its revitalization and attract new jobs and development to the area,” said Pavlov, R-St. Clair Township. “This is great news for these businesses and for the entire community.”

Pavlov said the project is expected to generate total private investment in the amount of $286,182.

The grant is made available by the Michigan Economic Development Corporation (MEDC) with funds provided by the federal CDBG program.

The Michigan Strategic Fund, in cooperation with MEDC, administers the economic and community development portions of the CDBG program, which utilizes funds received from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

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Expansion of successful jobs training program approved by Senate committee

LANSING—A Senate committee passed legislation Wednesday that would expand the Michigan New Jobs Training Program (MNJTP), a successful statewide initiative established in 2008 to promote job growth and provide skilled training to workers through local community colleges.

“The Michigan New Jobs Training Program has been very successful in promoting opportunities and connecting businesses and community colleges to meet the need for specific skilled training,” said Sen. Mark C. Jansen, R-Grand Rapids, sponsor of Senate Bill 1074. “I am grateful for Senator Phil Pavlov’s strong support of SB 1074, which will allow the program to expand on the more than 6,800 new jobs created since 2009.”

Pavlov chairs the Senate Education Committee, which approved Jansen’s measure. Pavlov said putting people back to work in Michigan has been his top priority since arriving in the Senate.

“The Michigan New Jobs Training Program is helping create jobs and improve the lives of thousands of people across the state,” said Pavlov, R-St. Clair Township. “The program is driven by local communities for the benefit of local workers. Senator Jansen’s bill will remove some of the program’s arbitrary restrictions and maximize its job-creation potential.”

The MNJTP lets community colleges statewide create a training pool through flexible financing mechanisms to support employers who are creating jobs or expanding operations in Michigan. SB 1074 would remove certain technical restrictions to allow the program to expand.

The program generated more than $76 million in additional earnings and 2,266 new jobs in 2012 alone, according to a report issued last year by the Anderson Economic Group (AEG), an independent economic research and consulting firm based in East Lansing. Going forward, the AEG study projects the MNJTP annually to generate $143 million in additional earnings and more than 4,700 jobs.

Under the program, training for newly hired workers is paid by capturing the state income tax associated with the new employees’ wages and redirecting it to a local college, instead of to the state. These new jobs must pay at least 175 percent of the state minimum wage (or $14.26 per hour).

Last week, St. Clair County Community College President Dr. Kevin Pollock and Magna International Inc. CEO Frank Ervin testified before the committee on how successful the MNJTP has been. Northwestern Michigan College and General Motors Co. also indicated their support.

On Wednesday, Sai Tatineni, managing director of SMR Automotive’s Marysville facility, spoke to the panel.

“We at SMR are grateful for this program,” Tatineni said. “It targets exactly the right training at the right time and in the right place—moving the company in the right direction.”

The committee also heard from WABCO North America, a tier-one automotive supplier in Rochester Hills that partners with Oakland County Community College, and Johnson Controls of Holland, which holds an MNJTP contract with Grand Rapids Community College.

SB 1074 has been sent to the full Senate for further consideration.

Pavlov and Green to host Bay City town hall on protecting Lake Huron from nuclear waste

LANSING—State Sens. Phil Pavlov, R-St. Clair Township, and Mike Green, R-Mayville, are inviting Bay and Thumb area residents in the 25th and 31st Senate districts to a public town hall on Monday, Oct. 6 in Bay City to discuss legislative and other efforts to protect Lake Huron from a proposed Canadian nuclear waste dump.

Who:
Sen. Phil Pavlov, R-St. Clair Township;
Sen. Mike Green, R-Mayville; and
Anyone interested in the topic.

What:
A public town hall meeting to inform residents about a Canadian nuclear waste dump proposal and plans by Michigan lawmakers to stop it.

Canadian officials propose to bury 7 million cubic feet of radioactive waste less than a mile from the shore of Lake Huron, directly across the lake from residents of the Bay and Thumb regions.

Green and Pavlov are leading an effort in Lansing to halt construction of the dump. Their legislation has passed the Michigan Senate unanimously and awaits action in the House of Representatives. More than 70 communities throughout the region have recently passed resolutions in support of the measures.

When:
Monday, Oct. 6
6:30 to 8 p.m.

Where:
Pere Marquette Depot
1904 Room
1000 Adams St.
Bay City, MI 48708

For more information, contact Green’s office at 1-517-373-1777.

Senate committee approves Pavlov bill outlawing drone-type vehicles in hunting

LANSING—A state Senate committee passed legislation Thursday that would outlaw the use of certain aircraft while hunting.

Senate Bills 926 and 927, sponsored by Sens. Tom Casperson and Phil Pavlov, would prohibit the practice of hunting with an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV)—sometimes called a “drone”—or using a UAV to interfere with a person who is hunting.

“Hunting with drones would allow hunters to use remote-controlled, camera-equipped aircraft to locate wildlife in order to shoot and kill them for sport,” said Pavlov, R-St. Clair Township. “Several years ago, to help preserve the purity and the challenge of hunting game in Michigan, we passed legislation banning the practice of computer-assisted hunting. These bills will continue that same protection.”

Pavlov said using UAVs in hunting became an issue in Alaska after wildlife officials there learned that a moose was killed by a hunter using such an aircraft. That incident prompted the Alaska Board of Game to unanimously pass a regulation outlawing the practice.

Colorado and Montana recently outlawed the use of UAVs for hunting, while two other states, Idaho and Wisconsin, have existing prohibitions on the use of aircraft to hunt wildlife.

SBs 926 and 927 have been sent to the full Senate for consideration.

Pavlov chairs hearing featuring SC4 President Pollock, successful jobs program

LANSING-A Senate panel held a hearing on Wednesday on a bill to expand the successful Michigan New Jobs Training Program (MNJTP), an economic development incentive established in 2008.
 
"My top priority since arriving in the Michigan Senate has been putting people back to work in this state," said Senate Education Committee Chair Phil Pavlov, R-St. Clair Township. "This is a highly successful, locally driven program bringing benefits to communities all across Michigan. It's time to remove some arbitrary restrictions to the program and maximize its job-creation potential."
 
The MNJTP lets community colleges create a training pool through flexible financing mechanisms to support employers who are creating jobs or expanding operations in Michigan. Senate Bill 1074, sponsored by Sen. Mark C. Jansen, R-Grand Rapids, would remove certain technical restrictions to allow the program to expand.
 
Under the program, training for newly hired workers is paid by capturing the state income tax associated with the new employees' wages and redirecting it to a local college, instead of to the state. These new jobs must pay at least 175 percent of the state minimum wage (or $12.95 per hour).
 
St. Clair County Community College (SC4) is one of the schools taking part in the program. The college has existing partnerships with SMR Automotive of Marysville and Grace Engineering of Memphis, and a new contract between SC4 and Eissmann Automotive of Port Huron was just agreed to this month.
 
Dr. Kevin Pollock, president of SC4, testified about the value of the program to St. Clair County and the Thumb region. He touted the program's direct benefits, including 145 new jobs with SMR Automotive and Grace Engineering.
 
"In addition to job creation, key elements of the program include eliminating the skills gap by providing training that exactly meets employers' needs and providing local flexibility for educators and employers to design arrangements that meet the needs of individual communities," Pollock said.
 
The committee also heard testimony from Frank Ervin, CEO of Magna International Inc., which has a presence in St. Clair County. Mr. Ervin recognized the MNJTP as "a successful public/private partnership based on the recognition of the key challenges and the most effective solutions for Michigan and its residents" that has helped Magna to make "increased investment and hiring commitments in Michigan."
 
Sai Tatineni, managing director of SMR Automotive's Marysville facility, is scheduled to testify before the committee in a second hearing next Wednesday, Sept. 24. The committee is expected to vote on the bill to send it to the full Senate at that time.
 
Photo caption: St. Clair County Community College President Dr. Kevin Pollock testifies before the Senate Education Committee on the benefits of the Michigan New Jobs Training Program.
 
Photo caption: Sen. Phil Pavlov, R-St. Clair Township, speaks with Frank Ervin, CEO of St. Clair County’s Magna International Inc., about the benefits of the Michigan New Jobs Training Program.

Pavlov to Canada: ‘Follow your own standard’

Canadian panel reverses decision, allows Pavlov to speak at hearing
www.ProtectLakeHuron.com
 
KINCARDINE, Ontario—State Sen. Phil Pavlov addressed a Canadian panel on Thursday regarding the dangers a nuclear waste dump would pose to the environmental and economic health of the Great Lakes basin.
 
Pavlov spoke before the Deep Geologic Repository Joint Review Panel, which will decide whether to allow construction of the proposed facility on the shores of Lake Huron. The panel had earlier denied Pavlov the right to speak, but they reversed their decision this week.
 
Citing Canadian opposition to a similar U.S. plan in the 1980s, Pavlov asked the panel to adhere to the standard their own government set for nuclear waste storage.
 
In a statement dated Jan. 16, 1986, the Honorable Joe Clark—Canada’s then-secretary-of-state for external affairs—expressed opposition to the U.S. Nuclear Waste Repository Program regarding “any development that could present a transboundary threat to the welfare of Canadians or the integrity of the Canadian environment.”
 
“Canada has set the precedent, and I am requesting you follow that precedent and find an alternative location for this DGR,” said Pavlov, R-St. Clair Township. “Ontario Power Generation’s proposal to permanently bury radioactive waste on the shore of Lake Huron is contrary to sound public policy and breeches the responsibility we are all obliged to carry out as policymakers within the Great Lakes basin.”
 
Specifically, the Canadian foreign minister’s 1986 statement opposed a potential site in Maine—the Bottle Lake complex—located within 25 miles of the border and possibly at least partially in the St. Croix River watershed. The statement also opposed potential sites in Minnesota and Wisconsin because they were “in drainage basins that eventually flow into Canada”—including the Red River basin and the Great Lakes basin.
 
“Canadian officials were troubled about possible nuclear waste 25 miles from their border or near a shared watershed,” Pavlov said. “Today, they should be extremely disturbed that a Canadian company wants to bury 7 million cubic feet of radioactive waste less than one mile from the shore of Lake Huron—a decision that could devastate the largest supply of fresh water in the world. This plan cannot go forward.”
In June, the Michigan Senate unanimously approved measures designed to halt construction of the Lake Huron facility while strengthening Michigan’s protection of natural resources against radioactive waste. Since then, nearly 70 communities across Michigan’s Thumb region have passed official resolutions in support of the measures.
 
Pavlov continues to urge concerned residents to visit www.ProtectLakeHuron.com to sign a petition on the issue.
 
The hearings of the Deep Geologic Repository Joint Review Panel began on Tuesday and are expected to last about two weeks.
 
A copy of the 1986 “Statement Discours” by the Canadian Secretary of State for External Affairs can be seen here.
 
 

Pavlov and Green to host Sebewaing town hall on protecting Lake Huron from nuclear waste

LANSING—State Sens. Phil Pavlov, R-St. Clair Township, and Mike Green, R-Mayville, are inviting Bay and Thumb area residents in the 25th and 31st Senate districts to a public town hall on Monday, Sept. 22 in Sebewaing to discuss legislative and other efforts to protect Lake Huron from a proposed Canadian nuclear waste dump.

Who:
Sen. Phil Pavlov, R-St. Clair Township;
Sen. Mike Green, R-Mayville; and
Anyone interested in the topic.

What:
A public town hall meeting to inform residents about a Canadian nuclear waste dump proposal and plans by Michigan lawmakers to stop it.

Canadian officials propose to bury 7 million cubic feet of radioactive waste less than a mile from the shore of Lake Huron, directly across the lake from residents of the Bay and Thumb regions.

Green and Pavlov are leading an effort in Lansing to halt construction of the dump. Their legislation has passed the Michigan Senate unanimously and awaits action in the House of Representatives. More than 60 communities throughout the region have recently passed resolutions in support of the measures.

When:
Monday, Sept. 22
6:30 to 8 p.m.

Where:
Sebewaing Township Hall
14 East Sharpsteen St.
Sebewaing, MI 48759

For more information, contact Green’s office at 1-517-373-1777.