Sen. Pavlov announces November office hours

LANSING, Mich. — State Sen. Phil Pavlov, R-St. Clair Township, announced that upcoming office hours are scheduled for the 25th Senate District in Harbor Beach.

The senator will be available to meet with constituents at the following location and time:

Friday, Nov. 6
Al’s Restaurant
11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
123 S. Huron Ave.
Harbor Beach, MI 48441

All residents are welcome to hear a legislative update and discuss topics of interest. Office hours are for one-on-one discussions with the senator. Those unable to attend can contact Sen. Pavlov by calling his office toll-free at (866) 305-2125 or by selecting the Contact Me link above. Make sure to check this website for the most up-to-date information.

Pavlov applauds grants to Huron, Sanilac counties for homeowner rehabilitation projects

LANSING, Mich. — State Sen. Phil Pavlov attended a ceremony Monday where more than $600,000 in grants were awarded to Huron and Sanilac counties for homeowner rehabilitation projects.

The Michigan State Housing Development Authority (MSHDA) awarded a $259,600 grant to Huron County to enable the county to rehabilitate 11 owner-occupied housing units in Bad Axe, Harbor Beach, and Sebewaing.

MSHDA also awarded $365,800 to Sanilac County to enable the county to rehabilitate 14 owner-occupied housing units in Croswell, Lexington, and Marlette.

“The improvements to these housing units will enrich the lives of the homeowners,” said Pavlov, R-St. Clair Township. “These grants are a worthy investment.”

Pictured, from left: Sanilac County Treasurer Trudy Nicol; Sanilac County Administrator Kathy Dorman; MSHDA Director Kevin Elsenheimer; Sanilac County Commissioner, District 2 Justin Faber; state Sen. Phil Pavlov, R-St. Clair Township; Sanilac County Finance Director Kelly Gerstenberger.

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Pavlov announces committee hearings on Michigan’s academically failing schools

Sen. Phil Pavlov

Sen. Phil Pavlov

LANSING, Mich. — State Sen. Phil Pavlov, R-St. Clair Township, announced Wednesday that the Michigan Senate Education Committee will conduct a series of hearings on Michigan’s academically failing schools, beginning Wednesday, Nov. 4.

Who:
•    State Sen. Phil Pavlov, chairman of the Senate Education Committee;
•    Senate Education Committee members;
•    State of Michigan Superintendent of Public Instruction Brian Whiston;
•    Michigan Department of Education staff;
•    McLellan Law Offices Chairman Richard D. McLellan; and
•    Former Oakland Schools Superintendent Vickie Markavitch.
•    Invited guests include State School Reform Officer Natasha Baker and Office of Governor Rick Snyder, Senior Advisor for Education Karen McPhee. Other invitations are pending.

What:
A series of hearings of the Michigan Senate Education Committee on the topic of “Michigan’s academically failing schools.”

When:
Beginning Wednesday, Nov. 4, at 8:30 a.m.

Where:
Lansing. Note: Official public notices will be posted for each hearing, in accordance with Michigan’s Open Meetings Act.

Brief:
While a great deal of focus recently has been dedicated to the financial health of Michigan’s public schools, we must also remain mindful of the academic health of our schools.

Earlier this spring, the Legislature passed new “Early Warning” laws to let the departments of Education and Treasury better identify and prevent fiscal crisis in school districts. The conversation surrounding public schools’ fiscal health continues, most notably, with Gov. Snyder’s recently announced plans to address debt in Detroit Public Schools.

The academic health of our schools is equally important, and given the Legislature’s purview over elementary and secondary education provided for in the Michigan Constitution, it is appropriate that the Senate Education Committee should lead this discussion.

Senate Education Committee Chairman Phil Pavlov will facilitate this public conversation for the edification of policy makers, parents, educators, and the general public. The committee will hear from statewide education experts and welcomes ideas for solutions — legislative or otherwise — to the persistent problems that plague some of our public schools and deny our children the education they deserve.

Pavlov appointed to council, taskforce looking to improve the lives of special-needs children

Sen. Phil Pavlov

Sen. Phil Pavlov

LANSING, Mich. — State Sen. Phil Pavlov has been appointed to a statewide council and a taskforce that will investigate ways to improve the lives of Michigan children with special needs.

Gov. Rick Snyder appointed Pavlov to the Michigan Interagency Coordinating Council for Infants and Toddlers with Developmental Disabilities, and Lt. Gov. Brian Calley appointed Pavlov to Calley’s newly formed Special Education Task Force.

“It is crucial that we devote time and energy to addressing the unique challenges of educating children with special needs,” said Pavlov, R-St. Clair Township. “That is what this council and task force will do. I am honored to be asked to serve as a member of each of them.”

The Michigan Interagency Coordinating Council for Infants and Toddlers with Developmental Disabilities consists of 21 members who advise the Michigan Department of Education in the preparation of applications for financial and other assistance for infants and toddlers with developmental disabilities.

The council also advises and assists the department regarding the appropriate services for children from birth through age five. Pavlov will serve the remainder of a four-year term expiring Oct. 31, 2016.

“I am thankful for this group of appointees and their interest in helping to make a better quality of life for Michigan children with developmental disabilities,” Snyder said.

The Special Education Task Force will investigate five issues of concern: the special education rulemaking process, service coordination, restraint and seclusion practices, dispute resolution, and parental resources.

The task force will meet every week from Oct. 27 through Dec. 17. They will then deliver a report with recommendations on how Michigan can move forward more positively for those children with special needs and their families.

“Educating a child with special needs can present unique and difficult challenges, but it also is an opportunity to help a child build an independent, productive and self-determined future,” Calley said.

Pavlov: We cannot allow a nuclear Iran

LANSING, Mich. — Sen. Phil Pavlov voted on Wednesday for a Senate measure that would reject the U.S.-led nuclear agreement with Iran and press for a new agreement that will prevent all pathways to an Iranian nuclear weapon.

The Senate passed Senate Resolution 104, which urges Congress to reject the agreement.

“This agreement would create a direct threat to our national security at home and the national security interests of Israel and other allies,” said Pavlov, R-St. Clair Township. “It represents a severe threat to peace in the region and the world. We cannot allow a nuclear Iran.”

On July 14, a six-member coalition of nations, including the governments of Great Britain, France, Russia, China and Germany and led by the United States, reached an agreement with the Islamic Republic of Iran. Formally known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, the agreement seeks to limit Iran’s capacity to refine, store, and use weapons-grade nuclear material and develop nuclear weapons in exchange for international sanctions relief.

Pavlov said the agreement lacks strength and is not in the strategic interest of the United States and its allies.

“This agreement leaves in place much of Iran’s nuclear infrastructure and allows Iran to continue researching and developing nuclear material for use in intercontinental ballistic missiles that can strike the United States and short-range missiles to hit targets throughout the Middle East,” Pavlov said. “It legitimizes Iran’s nuclear program and does not block a path to a nuclear weapon.”

SR 104 states, in part:

“Given Iran’s history of deceiving the International Atomic Energy Agency and its refusal to recognize its nuclear program’s military dimension, the international community will be challenged keeping Iran’s nuclear weapons program in line with the agreement. With some of the toughest restrictions ending in ten years, Iran is 15 years from manufacturing a nuclear arsenal, which could sink the Middle East into a nuclear arms race.”

“President Obama struck a weak agreement, without strong enforcement provisions, with a regime that cannot be trusted,” Pavlov said. “The Iranian mullahs got everything they wanted, and the United States is now less safe as a result.”

Copies of SR 104 will be transmitted to the president of the United States Senate, the speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, and the members of the Michigan congressional delegation.

Pavlov bills would outlaw financial gain from aborted baby parts

Sen. Phil Pavlov

Sen. Phil Pavlov

LANSING, Mich. — Sen. Phil Pavlov introduced legislation on Thursday that would make it illegal in Michigan to financially benefit in any way by selling or distributing a fetus or any fetal tissue obtained from an elective abortion.

Senate Bill 564 would prevent a person from financially benefiting from or receiving any compensation for the distribution or transfer of an embryo, fetus or neonate (newborn child) that was obtained as a result of an elective abortion. SB 565 would prescribe a maximum sentence of five years in prison.

“Recent videos have shown officials haggling over the price of body parts of aborted babies. We must make sure this tragic, horrific practice does not happen in Michigan,” said Pavlov, R-St. Clair Township. “It is heartbreaking that this is happening at all in the United States, but these measures can help ensure it doesn’t happen here.”

Pavlov’s bills come on the heels of revelations of Planned Parenthood affiliates nationwide selling body parts of aborted babies. In July, Pavlov called on the Michigan departments of Health and Human Services and Licensing and Regulatory Affairs to launch formal investigations into Planned Parenthood affiliates across Michigan to determine whether or not any Michigan-based facilities have participated in the sale of babies’ body parts.

“Our conscience and our law are in agreement on this one — human life is not for sale,” Pavlov said.

SBs 564 and 565 have been sent to the Senate Oversight Committee for consideration.

Sen. Pavlov announces additional October office hours

LANSING, Mich. — State Sen. Phil Pavlov, R-St. Clair Township, announced that upcoming office hours are scheduled for the 25th Senate District in Bad Axe and Port Huron.

The senator will be available to meet with constituents at the following times:

Monday, Oct. 19
Peppermill Restaurant
10:30 a.m. – noon
685 N. Port Crescent St.
Bad Axe, MI 48413

Friday, Oct. 23
McDonald’s
10 – 11:30 a.m.
2509 Pine Grove Ave.
Port Huron, MI 48060

All residents are welcome to hear a legislative update and discuss topics of interest. Office hours are for one-on-one discussions with the senator. Those unable to attend can contact Sen. Pavlov by calling his office toll-free at (866) 305-2125 or by selecting the Contact Me link above. Make sure to check this website for the most up-to-date information.

Pavlov tours Army command center in Warren

Sen. Phil Pavlov

Sen. Phil Pavlov

LANSING, Mich. — Sen. Phil Pavlov on Monday toured the U.S. Army TACOM Life Cycle Management Command (LCMC) at the Detroit Arsenal in Warren.

Pavlov was part of a select group of state legislators who were given a tour of the facilities.

LCMC plays a strategic role in equipping and modernizing the Army’s ground and soldier systems and is responsible for more than 65 percent of the equipment found in the brigade combat team, the Army’s basic combat maneuver formation.

“I was thoroughly impressed with Maj. Gen. Gwen Bingham, her team of dedicated soldiers and professionals, and the state-of-the-art facilities here in Macomb County,” said Pavlov, R-St. Clair Township. “The work they do, day in and day out, is helping shape the future of our military and keeping America safe.”

Bingham is the commander of LCMC. LCMC is responsible for more than 3,200 product lines, including tanks, Bradley fighting vehicles, watercraft, trucks, robotics, howitzers, rifles, chemical and biological equipment, and more. The LCMC workforce consists of more than 19,000 personnel at more than 100 locations around the globe.

The economic impact at the Detroit Arsenal is about $2.7 billion annually.

“LCMC is a major supporter of the local economy and is an important part of the community,” Pavlov said. “I am happy they are located right here in Macomb County, contributing in such a significant way to the defense of the nation.”

Pavlov serves on international panel highlighting Canadian nuclear waste debate

LANSING, Mich. — Sen. Phil Pavlov on Tuesday spoke as part of an expert panel at a Toronto town hall meeting on the planned construction of a nuclear dump that could jeopardize the health of the Great Lakes ecosystem.

The “Stop The Great Lakes Nuclear Dump” panel invited Pavlov to join an international array of speakers to discuss Ontario Power Generation’s (OPG) plan to build a nuclear waste disposal facility in Kincardine, Ontario, less than a mile from the shores of Lake Huron.

“There has been a groundswell of opposition to this proposal, and for good reason,” said Pavlov, R-St. Clair Township. “OPG failed to consider any other sites for their dump other than this location near Lake Huron. Several environmental organizations, thousands of citizens, more than 100 Michigan communities, our U.S. senators, and other legislators have all called for an end to this proposal.

“Now, most recently, a noted expert in environmental impact assessment, Dr. Peter Duinker, says OPG’s environmental impact statement (EIS) has ‘significant flaws of approach and method.’ He also calls their work ‘not credible,’ the methods used ‘not defensible’ and the conclusions of the EIS ‘not reliable.’

“It is readily apparent that the construction of this site must not go forward.”

Pavlov led the Michigan Senate in passing legislation last year calling on the U.S. to invoke International Joint Commission provisions to stop the construction of the facility. In August, Michigan’s U.S. senators echoed Pavlov’s effort by introducing similar resolutions at the federal level.

Pavlov also started a petition, www.ProtectLakeHuron.com, signed by thousands, calling for an end to the dump.

The decision on whether or not to go forward with the plan is in the hands of the Canadian minister of the environment, who is expected to announce a decision by Dec. 2.

Note: For a print-quality version of this and other Pavlov photos, click the image or click Photowire under the Media Center tab, above.